Seminario "Mechanoresponsive and thermoresponsive materials: exploring new applications in mechanical engineering"

Venerdì, 12 Gennaio 2018
  • Luogo dell'evento: ore 15.30 | Aula IV - Università Niccolò Cusano
  • Indirizzo: Via don Carlo Gnocchi, 3 Roma

Il Dott. Ing. Filippo Cellini dell'Advanced Science Research Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) terrà un seminario dal titolo "Mechanoresponsive and thermoresponsive materials: exploring new applications in mechanical engineering".

Abstract
Recent advances in robotics, mechanical technology, and biomedical engineering are fueling the study of materials with advanced functionalities that can potentially substitute traditional mechanical and electronic components in the design of new devices. Mechanoresponsive and thermoresponsive materials are particularly interesting for their applications is sensing technologies and adaptive structures. Thus, understanding the physics underpinning materials' transformations and functional responses is important to inform the design of new engineering systems. In this talk, I will initially discuss the mechanoresponsive and thermoresponsive properties of synthetic polymers embedding fluorescent dye molecules, focusing on their applications to mechanical technology, environmental sensing, and particle image velocimetry (PIV). In the second part of the talk, I will present recent developments on the mechanical response of bi-layer graphene epitaxial films and other carbon-based materials with advanced mechanical properties.

Short Biografy
Dr. Filippo Cellini received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Sapienza University of Rome before completing his doctoral studies in mechanical engineering at New York University (NYU) in 2017. Filippo is currently a Research Associate in Nanoscience at the Advanced Science Research Center of the City University of New York (CUNY).
Filippo's research focuses on the experimental and fundamental study of the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of advanced materials and functional polymers toward the development of novel devices and physical sensors.

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